It has been some 14 years in the making but finally The Incredibles family has been Lego-ized. Besides being included in the now regrettably defunct Disney Infinity game – Yes, I enjoyed the Pirates of the Caribbean, Incredibles and the Star Wars playsets (missions) a whole heck of a lot – and the entertaining Rise of the Underminer, Frozone and the Parr family haven’t carved out their niche in the video game universe until now. Lego The Incredibles does chisel out a place for them but with mixed results.

The problem with Lego The Incredibles is two-fold. One, just like the movie, the game spotlights Elastigirl and downplays the rest of the super-powered family. That’s kinda like having a Fantastic Four game and only being able to play The Invisible Woman. The Incredibles is a family and a team. No matter what the plot of The Incredibles 2 is, players want to switch back and forth and not be forced to play as just one character and that character’s powers are the ability to stretch, of all things. The developers should have been permitted to create their own plot instead of just re-imagining The Incredibles movies like THQ did with Rise of the Underminer, which continued where the original movie left off.

The second problem is that unlike Rise of the Underminer or Disney Infinity, the Lego game framework restricts the characters and the fun you can have with them in the campaign mode. TT Fusion should have mimicked The Lego Ninjago Movie Video Game, which allowed for a more action-packed, energetic experience.

The Lego Incredibles campaign takes you by both hands as you trek through each level on an exceptionally linear rail, more so than your standard Lego game. There is a cool motorcycle level and a daring battle on a damaged airplane. However, much of the other levels are too straightforward and simple. The campaign and each level are quite short as well. It will take you approximately 10 or so hours to play through the entire campaign.

The two standout levels are Revelations, where you fight off nasty raccoons as baby Jack-Jack, and The Golden Years in which you travel back in time to Bob and Helen’s wedding night and all the mayhem that ensued. The Looney Tunes-like Jack-Jack and raccoon brawl is hysterical, especially the quick time events.

The game even guides you along when it comes to the puzzles. Most of them just require you to use a certain character and their power, which is quite obvious by the flashing markers, or there are enough clues presented to lead you in the right direction. For younger children, this will remove some of the headaches, enhancing the game’s flow for them. Older kids and adults may be wondering why there are puzzles when the answers are so clearly defined.

The open world portion of Lego The Incredibles compensates somewhat for its fairly fleeting campaign. Using any characters you have unlocked, you can scour the city for Crime Sprees, which turn out to be fairly lengthy side quests with their own short stories and timed, speed challenges. There are also cleverly hidden secret missions to unlock those precious red bricks which can unlock more characters, which unfortunately mostly lead to the same characters you already have just with different costumes. That’s kind of a bummer.

If you are just looking for something relaxed and uncomplicated to keep the kids busy or to pass the time, Lego The Incredibles 2 is a great choice, however, if you want something more substantial, you might want to check out The Lego Ninjago Movie Video Game or Lego Marvel’s Avengers instead.

THE GOOD
Plays like a movie.
Jack-Jack fights raccoons.
A charming time-waster.
The open world adventures.
THE BAD
Level format is too predictable.
No assortment of unlockable characters.
The Lego format restricts the action, gameplay.
Too much focus on one character for too long.
6
Fair

Review Summary

Want to relax and throw something on that you can breeze through without taxing your brain or your skills? Lego The Incredibles is your game.

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